Accept an Offer

Interviews and Offers

Crush Your Interview
 

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You have applied, waited patiently to hear back, and now you have received an interview! This is a key stage of the hiring process that is often overlooked by applicants, yet integral to job offers.

Embrace your interview by preparing in advance, similar to how you prepare for a final exam. This is your chance to speak about aspects of the position that excite you, give concrete examples of your qualifications, and connect with people at the organization. Use this page to interview and respond to job offers with confidence.

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Accept an Offer

Accepting an offer, either verbally or in writing, is an agreement to work for an employer. Because this is a serious matter, we recommend that you proceed with vigilance.

Accepting With Confidence

Accept an offer only after careful consideration. When you accept, you should feel 100% sure that you will begin your position under the agreed conditions.

Informing Other Employers

Once you accept an offer, you should inform all other organizations with which you have open applications. Similar to dating someone “exclusively,” the proper etiquette for hiring processes is to let other employers know when you are “taken.” While they may not be overjoyed to receive this news, it is your duty to communicate that you have accepted another offer and can no longer proceed with their hiring process.

Additionally, if you are currently employed, contact your supervisor soon to schedule a meeting in which you will provide your notice for leaving your position (for professional etiquette, give 2-4 weeks of advance notice).

Avoiding a Change of Plans at All Costs

When you accept an offer, your new employer expects you to commit to fulfilling that role, as they do not extend multiple offers for one position. If you later decline or “renege” on your offer before your first day of work, it is considered very unprofessional and can burn permanent bridges in your network and in other UCSB students’ networks. This is an important consideration for your long-term career ahead.

For positions found through Handshake or other recruitment programs offered by Career Services (e.g., On-Campus Interviews), reneging on an offer is a serious recruiting violation. Significant repercussions--including loss of your Handshake privileges and participation in Career Services recruitment programs--can be incurred and are evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the department. 

For these reasons, it is very important to ensure that you proceed thoughtfully with any offer of employment and feel confident that you will deliver on your commitments.

In summary, do not renege after accepting an offer, except in cases of extreme personal emergency.

Moving Forward

Now that you’ve landed your position and made it official, it’s time for the real learning to begin! Your first day of work has almost arrived.
 

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